Wildlife in the Garden: Squirrel in London

Squirrel in rose pot. He looks soooo guilty!

Squirrel in rose pot. He looks soooo guilty!

For March, Jude is looking for wildlife in the garden. These photos from when I lived in London (circa 2005 in this case) are pretty rubbish quality, but you can see the furry little devil in action. (This patio and the pot of mini yellow roses also appears in this post.) This squirrel and I had ongoing battles marked by offensive and counter-offensive. For example, I set up a feeder for the birds, which he promptly began to climb …

You have to admire his determination.

You have to admire his determination.

… until I added a homemade anti-squirrel device. Try as he might, he could not climb around that cone!

This is the pole after I added my nifty DIY squirrel defence.

This is the pole after I added my nifty DIY squirrel defence.


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Winter Garden 2 – Walpole Park

Exotic spiky palm-type plants in the snow.

The sunken garden, and exotic spiky palm-type plants in the snow.

I’ve gone with a large interpretation of “garden” for this winter garden post. These photos are of Walpole Park, which is in Ealing Broadway (London). I lived across the road from this 28-acre site for a year or so (not the same place in last week’s snowy patio photos).

Fountain and cherry tree

Fountain and cherry tree, a sprinkle of snow — and a bench! 😉

According to Wikipedia, “In 1987 Walpole Park was registered by English Heritage on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. Within its boundaries are the Pitzhanger Manor museum & art gallery and Perceval Lodge. These buildings and part of the boundary wall are also statutory protected structures of Grade I and Grade II respectively. There is also a late Victorian ornamental lake bordering the House’s rear lawn and further west a pond which has a pair of fountains, both of which attract waterfowl. The original house which stood here, and its grounds which make up the present park, was once the property of John Soane the architect, who bought it in 1800. After several more changes of ownership it was purchased by the Urban District Council of Ealing in 1900.”

Tulips and pansies in the snow.

Tulips and pansies in the snow.

Rosegarden in the snow.

Rose garden in the snow.

“Most of the park consists of open flat grassed areas bordered by tree lined avenues.” (Wikipedia) You can get an idea of those open areas and trees in these next two shots.

Tree blossom weighed down with snow.

Tree blossom weighed down with snow.

A line of flowering trees dusted with snow.

A line of flowering trees dusted with snow.

And I just like the whimsy of this cute little guy with his flower petal buttons, and branches for arms.

Snowman with petal buttons.

Snowman with petal buttons.

“The park was extensively renovated from August 2013 onwards and reopened fully in the summer of 2014.” (Wikipedia) My photos were taken in late winter/early spring 2008, so I’ll have to go back and see how this lovely park and its gardens have changed.


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Winter Garden 1 – my patio

tulips in snow

Okay, I admit it — this is staged. I thought the punch of the tulips’ colours would look good in this photo of my patio and communal lawn in winter, so I brought the vase outside.

Gardens in Winter. Well, that poses a definite challenge for me (thanks Jude!). I was not even semi-seriously interested in photography until a couple of years ago, long after I moved to Australia — and although we have a winter of sorts in Sydney, to me (having lived in Canada until I was 29) winter means snow, and serious cold. What I’m getting at is that my “gardens in winter” photos date to the small span of years that matched me living in London and owning a digital camera. So, here are a few shots of my patio in London, in the winter of 2007.

Brave yellow mini rose after a January snowfall.

Brave yellow mini rose after a January snowfall. (You’ll see this rose again in March for the Wildlife theme!)

Rosehips in January.

Rosehips in January.


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