Image

Queen Elizabeth Hall Roof Garden

That’s the London Eye in the backround, and beyond it the clock tower of the Houses of Parliament in scaffolding.

Atop the roof of the Queen Elizabeth Hall (Southbank Centre, London) you’ll find a garden. A few months ago I posted this bee photo and said I’d follow up with a post about the garden itself.

A moment too late to capture this bee on the flower!

The trees and other plantings provide a pleasant spot to relax for a while.

Bubbly is optional. 😉

Advertisements
Image

Pink and yellow and nameless

It might be type of bottlebrush (callistemon), but I really don’t know. It’s another of those Aussie bush plants I can never remember! The flower is pretty, though. I saw it in the Perth Botanic Gardens but did not think to photograph its label. 😦

Image

Wisteria

Gore Hill Cemetery, established in 1868, can be found in the northern Sydney suburb of St Leonards. It’s a marvellous retreat from the city bustle that surrounds it, and when I worked nearby I often went for a wander on my lunch hour. In spring, the wisteria tumbles exuberantly over old worn gravestones. These photos are from last spring.

The tree with yellow flowers in Golden Wattle.

The tree with yellow flowers is Golden Wattle.

Aside

Bee on a flower

A bee in London

I spotted this bee (and quite a few of its companions!) at the Queen Elizabeth Hall Roof Garden in London. The garden is a delightful spot, beside the River Thames but removed from the bustle below. Bees face such threats these days so I was pleased to see so many of them here, apparently thriving. I’ll do a post on the garden when I’ve finished editing the photos, but I’m quite proud of this bee so thought I’d share it now. 🙂

update: By coincidence, a few hours after I posted this photo I watched an episode of “Hidden Britain by Drone” which featured the honeybee hives atop Fortnum & Mason in London. According to the program, London has the highest concentration of honeybees in the country, and bees can fly up to 5km for food. I wonder where ‘my’ bees’ hive was?

Image

The garden in summer

morning glories

My favourite photo of the garden: morning glories bathed in early light.

Back to my parents’ garden for this post, a look at the garden in its summer finery.

Eat your veggies

In my family, the beans below have been known as “mystery beans from Russia” for years. My parents were introduced to the beans by the people from whom my grandparents bought this house. All that was known about the beans is that the seeds came with immigrants to Canada from Russia. A bit of Googling reveals them probably to be Yellow Romano beans. Regardless of their name, they are very tasty!

You can’t cook without herbs! Though in these photos below, the herbs look nothing like you’d find in a supermarket packet.


Dill

Dill

My parents also grow plums and pears. If I remember right (Mum, feel free to correct me here) they harvested more than 500 of each this year. (The evil squirrels took a few hundred for themselves.) I know, you’re thinking “what on earth do they do with all that fruit??” Mum preserves some, but most of the fruit is turned into wine by Dad.

Flowers galore!

These are the show stoppers, in my opinion.





Hanging baskets on the site of the old apple tree.

Hanging baskets on the site of the old apple tree.

Birds and critters

There are also cardinals and blue jays, both of which come to the patio for peanuts, but they never stay still long enough for me to capture them as anything other than a blur moving out of frame.

Cute, but Public Enemy Number 1

Cute, but Public Enemy Number 1


Also cute,  but Public Enemy Number 2

Also cute, but Public Enemy Number 2

This Monarch butterfly regards the garden as his (her?) own territory, and patrols each day in early evening. This is a terrible photo (extreme of my zoom), but I’ve applied some filters and softening for an arty look to hide the grainy lack of focus.

Monarch butterfly on zinnia.

Monarch butterfly on zinnia.

Relaxing

Could anything be more pleasant than dining on the patio with the garden as a backdrop? Food made by Mum, wine made by Dad.

Note the tomatoes in the dishes, straight from the garden.

Note the tomatoes in the dishes, straight from the garden.


Tropical Prawn Cocktails and sparkling wine

Tropical Prawn Cocktails and sparkling wine


My parents' garden